9 of 365: Attractiveness bias #design #principle


9 of 365 - attractiveness bias design principle by John LeMasney via lemasney.com

9 of 365 – attractiveness bias design principle by John LeMasney via lemasney.com

Attractiveness bias is a design principle that allows designers to act upon noted preferences in humans for (typically) other humans who seem to be whole, symmetrical, appear genetically and otherwise healthy, and nutritionally sound. A commonly cited example for attractiveness bias is the televised debate between Nixon and Kennedy, where people who saw the debate said overwhelmingly that Kennedy won the debate, and those who only listened to the debate felt generally that Nixon won the debate. The difference can be explained in the differences in their appearances, where Kennedy is said to have looked younger, stronger, more healthy, more attractive, and more steady than Nixon in the debate.

In my illustration here, I decided to take an attractive image of a female and alter her feature symmetry and skin tone to make her less attractive, and thus less preferred.

 

This content is published under the Attribution 3.0 Unported license.

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